Image hosted by Photobucket.com
I figured I ought to share some knowledge with you all about how to go about buying a new puppy for your home. I know some of you are looking, and you might be wondering what to look for in a pup to make sure you get a quality dog. Well, here are some puppy buying basics.
 
Image hosted by Photobucket.com
A good place to start is to really look at your lifestyle. How often are you home? How much attention can you give your new puppy? Are you active, or lazy? These are some of the important questions you will need to ask yourself to ensure a proper match with your new pup. For example, if you are lazy.. you will not want to go out and get a hyper dog, such as a border collie or Boston Terrier. If you are active, the opposite applies.. you won’t want a basset hound. So make sure you do plenty of research to find the right breed of dog for you.

 

 

Image hosted by Photobucket.com
Once you’ve found the breed that meets your personality and lifestyle, the next step is to find a breeder. Make sure to find a well known, or at very least, responsible breeder. You will not want to buy a puppy off the side of the street because you have no idea what you are getting. Most breeders will place adds in the paper saying that their breed is registered with AKC. This is a good sign, but make sure when you visit that it is not a puppy mill.
 
Image hosted by Photobucket.com
When you find a good breeder ask to see both the parents of the pups if possible. This will give you an idea of the puppies potential in temperment, personality, looks, and health. Also, ask the breeder for as much information about the line and the dog as possible. A good breeder will have a lot of stories to tell about the dogs in the pedigree. If you are looking for a show dog, make sure that the puppies conformation (how it looks and moves) measures up the to the breeds standard. If you are just looking for a good pet, the pay more attention to temperamant and intelligence. If you are a first time purebred owner, you may want to let the breeder help you select a pup. Sometimes a litter of puppies has an individual that is very dominant or submissive. Extremes in temperament can be difficult to raise if you have not done it before. Since the breeder has studied the puppies from birth, the breeder will  be qualified to tell you the temperament of each pup. You can also use this general rule of thumb to select a pup: For an average pet, do not take the boldest puppy in the litter, the one that runs to you first and pushes the other pups out of the way. Such an animal may be difficult to handle. Many people feel that the boldest puppy instantly fell in love with them and fought to be the first to reach them, but this is not the case. The dog just wanted to maintain its position as a bully, and may try to push you around as well. However, that is how I ended up with Oreo, and he’s been a good dog… except for jumping the fence, and bullying Chance and Mitsy for food, and toys!
 
To test the pups aggressiveness, roll it over on it’s back and hold it there for 10 seconds. If the pup tries to bite your hands and wiggles a lot, you’ve go an aggressive, dominant pup. If the pup simply lays there and looks around, why.. then you’ve got a submissive, well balanced pup. All of the pups in the litter shoud appear healthy. Here are some things to look for.. Their coats shoud shine, you should be able to just feel the ribs when you run your fingers over their sides ( meaning their wait should be just right), they should not have fleas or ticks on them, no offensive odor, and if they have teeth they should be clean and healthy. Also, watch for disease symptoms such as runny eyes, discharge from the nose, bald spots, sores, and so on.
 
So now you know what to look for, now you need to know what age is best to take home a puppy. Well, there are many opinions on this. The general range in age is 7 to 12 weeks old. Taking a puppy away from the mother before 7 weeks is not a good idea, because the puppy needs interaction with it’s mother and litter mates until then. That is important to help the pup become sociable with other dogs at a more mature age. Breeders who are in it for the money will be spotted easily because they will typically let the pups go at around 5 weeks old. You do not want to get a puppy from that type of operation. If you pick a responible breeder, your puppy will have had it’s first set of shots by the time you take it home.
 
Ok, so you now know the basics as to how to choose the right puppy for you. When you bring your new pal home, try to spend as much time as possible with him/her. Your pup will be in a new inviroment, and will need your love to deal with the stress. You wouldn’t want to bring your new puppy home and then stick it in a kennel and leave it, that could cause some serious problems for you and the pup.
 
If you have any questions for me, you all know you can ask them in the comment area and I will get back to you a.s.a.p. Take care, and remember, you should be picky and patient when you are looking for a new four legged friend, but it should also be fun.
 
 
 

Image hosted by Photobucket.com

Advertisements