Some of you requested information about Boston Terriers. So… here it is! A quote right out of the book: Boston Terriers, A Complete Pet Owner’s Manual by Barron’s.

History Of The Breed:                                    

The Boston Terrier was developed by crossing the Old English Toy Bulldog with the white English Terrier, and adding in a bit of French Bulldog. Through inbreeding, mutations, and accidents, the Boston Terrier was shaped into what it is today.

The Old English Toy Bulldog was similar to the Boston Terrier but the breed tended to be small, and in the nineteenth century it was considered to have no useful purpose. Toy Bulldogs had a following in France, and most were exported there rather than to the United States. It is said that the Boston Terrier was created out of curiosity-to see what could be developed-and, perhaps, to produce a new fighting dog. But it never gained popularity as a fighter. Instead, it later became popular with women as a pet.

The early Boston Terriers did not look anything like today’s version, and the original Beacon Hill breeders would not at all appreciate what they would see today. Most likely, they would consider the modern breed to be much too fine and effeminate. The original Boston Terrier was developed as a "man’s" dog. It was not bred for markings or color but rather for its small size.

During the nineteenth century it was common practice to prefix a dog’s personal name with the last name of its owner. Thus, the ancestor of all modern Boston Terriers was a dog known as Hooper’s Judge. Judge lived during the 1860’s and was owned by Mr. Robert C. Hooper of Boston. Mr. Hooper purchased Judge from Mr. William O’Brien, who had imported the dog from Europe.

The Boston Terrier was developed in 1865 by a handful of coachmen living in the Beacon Hill area of Boston. They used their employers’ purebred dogs as foundation stock to create a unique new breed. The Boston Terrier is one of the pure American breeds! (Correction, Boston’s are not the only pure american breed, my bad)!

 

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